Author Topic: Recommendations Announced for 2011 Lake Erie Yellow Perch and Walleye Quotas  (Read 9434 times)

Offline Dave Kelch, Sea Grant Extension Specialist

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Please see the news release below from the Great Lakes Fishery Commission for the Lake Erie Yellow Perch and Walleye Catch Limits recommendations for 2011.

Although the numbers for walleye are slightly higher than in 2010, with the yellow perch numbers being just slightly lower, this does not mean that recreational angler bag limits and commercial fishery quotas will be the same as in 2010. These Ohio limits and commercial quotas are set by the ODNR/Division of Wildlife based upon the GLFC's Lake Erie Committee recommendations. Hence, 2001 bag limits and commercial quotas will be forthcoming.

Dave Kelch, Ohio Sea Grant Extension Specialist, Ohio Sea Grant College Program



For Immediate Release                                                                     
March 25, 2011                                                                   
                                                                                                                                                   
Contacts:

Canada:  John Cooper:  705-755-5476
USA:  Marc Gaden:               734-662-3209 x 14

Bi-national Panel Recommends Lake Erie Yellow Perch and Walleye Catch Limits for 2011

2011 yellow perch and walleye levels similar to last year


YPSILANTI, MI – The Lake Erie Committee, a bi-national board of fishery managers from Michigan, New York, Ohio, Ontario, and Pennsylvania, recommended a 2011 total allowable catch (TAC) of 12.651 million pounds of yellow perch and 2.919 million walleye[1].  The yellow perch and walleye TACs are similar to last year’s levels.  These recommendations are based on extensive biological assessments and analyses by Canadian and American fishery agencies.  For both yellow perch and walleye, the committee is moving forward on a revision of fisheries policies and guidelines for the future.  The intent is to fully engage all stakeholders throughout that process. 

Said Lake Erie Committee chair Don Einhouse of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, “The relative constancy of both the walleye and yellow perch TACs reflects the committee’s interest in providing stability to fisheries as we develop revised walleye and yellow perch harvest policies, with input from stakeholders.  We understand that in certain areas, the biological risk at these levels of harvest may increase, but will not threaten the sustainability of the resource as we transition to new policies.”


YELLOW PERCH

Overall, yellow perch stocks in Lake Erie are on the decline, though the stocks are stronger in the lake’s eastern part than in other areas of the lake.  For 2011, the Yellow Perch Task Group estimates the presence of 130 million yellow perch in Lake Erie, a 28% reduction from 2010 and a reduction from more than 400 million fish in the mid-2000s.  The decline is due to a weak year class in 2009.  The fishery is currently sustained by older fish from some good recruitment during the past decade. 

Given the state of the Lake Erie yellow perch fishery, the committee recommended a 2011 TAC of 12.651 million pounds, a small decrease from last year’s allocation of 13.137 million pounds.  The consensus among committee members is that weak year classes may lead to lower allocations in some management units in the future. 

The five jurisdictions on the lake divide the lake wide allocation of yellow perch based on allocation formulas by management unit.  For 2011, Ontario’s allocation is 6.182 million pounds, Ohio’s allocation is 4.991 million pounds, and Michigan’s allocation is 0.188 million pounds.  New York and Pennsylvania will receive 0.246 million pounds and 1.044 million pounds, respectively.  In 2010, actual lake wide yellow perch harvest was 9.69 million pounds or 74% of the TAC.

 
WALLEYE

The Lake Erie Committee recommended a bi-national TAC for walleye in 2011 of 2.919 million fish, compared to the TAC of 2.200 million fish in 2010. Actual walleye harvest in 2010 was approximately 2.0 million fish, or 91% of the TAC.   The Committee’s Walleye Task Group—comprising scientists and field biologists—reported that walleye recruitment in recent years has been moderate, particularly the 2007 year class.  Fish from the 2007 year class and the exceptional 2003 hatch remain the major contributors to the fishery.   The increased TAC recommendation for 2011 reflects the committee’s consensus that walleye status in Lake Erie appears better than previously forecasted.

The TAC is recommended by the Lake Erie Committee and is allocated to Ohio, Michigan and Ontario by an area-based sharing formula of walleye habitat within each jurisdiction in the western and central basins of the lake.  Under a 2011 TAC of 2.919 million fish, Ohio will be entitled to 1.492 million fish, Ontario 1.257 million fish, and Michigan 0.170 million fish.   The walleye fisheries of eastern Lake Erie remain outside the quota management area and harvest limits in that area are established by Ontario, Pennsylvania, and New York. 

Said Committee Chair Don Einhouse, “The Lake Erie Committee is aware that the 2011 TAC recommendation, while an increase from last year, is still lower than TACs of five to ten years ago and substantially lower from TACs of the 1980s and 1990s.  Abundance of walleye in Lake Erie today is estimated to be 21.2 million fish, compared to highs of between 70 and 80 million fish in the past.”

Einhouse added:  “The committee remains committed to promoting sustainable walleye fisheries while allowing for the careful allocation of the fish based on annual biological assessments, modeling, and deliberation among the jurisdictions, with continued input from our valued stakeholders.”



LAKE ERIE COMMITTEE

The Lake Erie Committee comprises fishery managers from Michigan, New York, Ohio, Ontario and Pennsylvania. The committee’s work is facilitated by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, a Canadian and U.S. agency on the Great Lakes.  Each year the committee recommends a total allowable catch for walleye and yellow perch.  Total allowable catch represents the number or weight of fish that can be caught by sport and commercial fishers without putting the stocks at risk.  The individual agencies implement the recommended total allowable catch.  For more information, visit the Lake Erie Committee online at www.glfc.org/lec.

—30—


****************************************************
Marc Gaden, PhD
Communications Director and Legislative Liaison
Great Lakes Fishery Commission
2100 Commonwealth Blvd. Ste 100
Ann Arbor, MI  48105
734-662-3209 x. 14
marc@glfc.org
www.glfc.org

Offline Tory Gabriel, Ohio Sea Grant

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I just got back from the meeting, and the above is an excellent summary of the TAC announcement.  As Dave said, the ODNR will now use these numbers to establish the bag limits which will officially come out in the coming weeks.  That said, through conversations I had at the meeting and a glance at the above numbers I expect bag limits to remain the same for both walleye and yellow perch.  We'll know for sure soon enough. 

Another noteworthy item: in the release above, it states "The increased TAC recommendation for 2011 reflects the committee’s consensus that walleye status in Lake Erie appears better than previously forecasted."  This is certainly true, as the 2010 estimated stock size (age-2 and older) of walleyes is a better-than-projected 26.69 million fish.  This figure, however, still puts the fishery at the low end of the "maintenance" category.  Using these same models the 2011 estimated stock size falls to 21.2 million, and the 2012 estimated stock size is projected at 22.3 million.  Both of these figures would drop the fishery to the "low quality" category.  So in summary: yes the stock size is better than expected, but we could sure use some good hatches for a few years to get that number climbing upward and eventually back in to the "high quality" category. 

Offline Tory Gabriel, Ohio Sea Grant

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Also, for those that just want the quick and dirty numbers:

The 2011 walleye TAC is 2.919 million fish, a 33% increase from 2010's TAC of 2.20 million fish.   Based upon water surface area in lake management units, Ohio's share will be 1.492 million walleye.  Ontario's quota will be 1.257 million walleye and 170,000 for Michigan.

The 2011 yellow perch TAC is 12.651 million pounds, a 4% reduction over the 2010 TAC.  These have been divided among management units (MU) as follows:

MU 1 - 2.071 million lb
MU 2 - 3.537 million lb
MU 3 - 6.251 million lb
MU 4 - 0.792 million lb

Further apportionment of these TACs among sport and commercial interests in Ohio will be announced later. The figure below illustrates the yellow perch management units and how individual TACS are shared among jurisdictions.


ed labounty

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stocking
« Reply #3 on: 03/26/11, 08:07 »
being just aregular person without degrees titles etc .  i understand gene pools needle in a haystack  reducing trophy size fish by stocking  walleye in lake erie it seems to me that if gene pool is of a problem seems that eggs from certain identifiable gene groups could be collected from the areas of same  people from all over the midwest and further come to lake erie to catch walleye  standard size walleye the trophy aspect is a unexpected bonus for most with the exception of tournament fishers   . it amazes me that cities along the shore of the western basin let the dollars spent by locals not even counting out of stae walleye seekerslet the dnr raise over 30 million fish large numbers of hybrid non  reproductive fish not one for lake erie oh i forgot the steelhead stocking program that seems to hold its own for the canadian side catching ohio raised fish by the bucket full.also the east part of ohio pennsylvania newyork all benefit from ohios steelhead programthat compete and gobble up the forage base is that why a lot of the perch caught are feeding on invasive seafleas and bootm larva probably more polluted than minnows. why not spend some money on lake erie raise 30 millionn walleyesfor a couple of yearsfor erie i do not have the numbers but it seems to me  that from an income to the state ill bet erie supports most of thatrevenue for inland fish . how bout having egg and milt collection stations on the sandusky and maumeeif the water is cold or turpid couldnt those eggs be held or placed in a suitable spot

Othmar

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Nice articles . But , I was looking for the following.

Have a pond. Friends want to fish in it. What should I ask them to put back (release) for breeding stock?

Thank you. beigeljo@aol.com

Offline John Hageman

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I really depends on a lot of factors: age of the pond, species involved, size structure of the fish currently found in the pond, amount of vegetative cover (algae, submersed plants, emergent plants), size of pond, etc.

OSU has a pond management extension specialist in Columbus that you can alos call for detailed pond management strategies. Let us know what conditions you presently have.......

Offline Dave Kelch, Sea Grant Extension Specialist

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GO TO:  http://ohioline.osu.edu/b374/index.html
 OSU EXTENSION Ohio Pond Management Bulletin 374-99
SCROLL DOWN TO CONTENTS AN CLICK ON Maintaining Good Fishing
 HOPE THIS IS HELPFUL

DAVE KELCH, OHIO SEA GRANT EXTENSION SPECIALIST


I really depends on a lot of factors: age of the pond, species involved, size structure of the fish currently found in the pond, amount of vegetative cover (algae, submersed plants, emergent plants), size of pond, etc.

OSU has a pond management extension specialist in Columbus that you can alos call for detailed pond management strategies. Let us know what conditions you presently have.......