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External Partner Publication

Publications produced by an external partner and made available for reference

These are publications produced by an external partner and made available to our users for convenience. Ohio Sea Grant does not own any of the content in the publications listed below.


DETAILS TYPE

Global and National Nutrient Issues and Management

EXT-1574

Peter Kleinman’s presentation slides from 2018 State of the Science Conference.

External Partner Publication

Harmful Algal Blooms and Nutrient Management Efforts in Wisconsin

EXT-1573

Accompanying slides from Gina Laliberte’s presentation at the State of the Science conference.

External Partner Publication

Tracking Nutrients to Guide Management Across Northwest Ohio Watersheds

EXT-1572
External Partner Publication

The Maumee Watershed: Practices Approaching Targets

EXT-1571
External Partner Publication

Edge of Field Monitoring

EXT-1570
External Partner Publication

Trials and Economics of Implementing Ag BMP’s in Mercer County, Ohio

EXT-1569
External Partner Publication

Manure Management of Confined Livestock Operations in the Maumee Watershed

EXT-1568
External Partner Publication

Expanding the Manure Application Window by Application to Growing Crops

EXT-1567
External Partner Publication

Selection and Comparison of Conservation Practices: BMP Handbook

EXT-1566
External Partner Publication

Transforming Drainage Retaining Water to Improve Crop Yields and Water Quality

EXT-1565
External Partner Publication

Maumee River nutrient loading March 1 – July 31, 2018

EXT-1564

Presented at the 2018 Harmful Algal Bloom Forecast

LENGTH: 22 pages
External Partner Publication

2018 Forecast Western Lake Erie Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Bloom

EXT-1563

Presented at the 2018 Harmful Algal Bloom Forecast

LENGTH: 15 pages
External Partner Publication

Sunning themselves in heaps, knots, and snarls: The extraordinary abundance and demography of island watersnakes

EXT-1575
ABSTRACT:

Snakes represent a sizable fraction of vertebrate biodiversity, but until recently, data on their demography have been sparse. Consequently, generalizations regarding patterns of variation are weak and the potential for population projections is limited. We address this information gap through an analysis of spatial and temporal variation in demography (population size, annual survival, and realized population growth) of the Lake Erie Watersnake, Nerodia sipedon insularum, and a review of snake survival more generally. Our study spans a period during which the Lake Erie Watersnake was listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, recovered, and was delisted. We collected capture–mark–recapture data at 14 study sites over 20 years, accruing 20,000 captures of 13,800 individually marked adults. Lake Erie Watersnakes achieve extraordinary abundance, averaging 520 adults per km of shoreline (ca. 260 adult per ha) at our study sites (range = 160–1,600 adults per km; ca. 80–800 adults per ha) and surpassing population recovery and postdelisting monitoring criteria. Annual survival averages 0.68 among adult females and 0.76 among adult males, varies among sites, and is positively correlated with body size among study sites. Temporal process variance in annual survival is low, averaging 0.0011 or less than 4% of total variance; thus, stochasticity in annual survival may be of minor significance to snake extinction risk. Estimates of realized population growth indicate that population size has been stable or increasing over the course of our study. More generally, snake annual survival overlaps broadly across continents, climate zones, families, subfamilies, reproductive modes, body size categories, maturation categories, and parity categories. Differences in survival in relation to size, parity, and maturation are in the directions predicted by life history theory but are of small magnitude with much variation around median values. Overall, annual survival appears to be quite plastic, varying with food availability, habitat quality, and other ecological variables.

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.4191 VOLUME: 8 ISSUE: 15 LENGTH: 21 pages
External Partner Publication

New 4-H booklet all about fishing, authored in Ohio

EXT-1576
ABSTRACT:

John Hageman takes his pen to Ohio Outdoor News to tell the state about the new 4-H fishing booklet published by Ohio State University.

External Partner Publication

Careers in the Green Industry

EXT-1555

Powerpoint for Brent R. Repenning’s Presentation on careers in the Green Industry from the June 14, 2018 Stone Lab Guest Lecture

LENGTH: 32 pages
External Partner Publication

We All Have a Role to Play in Climate Change Education

EXT-1554

Powerpoint from Jason Cervenec’s presentation on climate change and individual impacts from the June 14, 2018 Stone Lab Guest Lecture

LENGTH: 56 pages
External Partner Publication

Early onset of a microcystin-producing cyanobacterial bloom in and agriculturally-influenced Great Lakes tributary

EXT-1552
ABSTRACT:

In late May 2016, a cyanobacterial harmful algal bloom (cHAB) was detected in the Maumee River, the largest tributary to Lake Erie, the southernmost lake of the Laurentian Great Lakes system. Testing on 31 May identified Planktothrix agardhii as the dominant cyanobacterium with cell abundance exceeding 1.7×10 9 cells/L and total microcystins (MC) reaching 19 μg/L MC-LR equivalents, a level over 10-fold higher than the 2015 revised U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) national health advisory levels for drinking water exposure to adults. Low river discharge coincident with negligible precipitation through the latter half of May coincided with an 80% decline in river turbidity that likely favored bloom formation by a low-light adapted P. agardhii population. Also contributing to the cHAB were high initial nutrient loads and an increase of the river temperature from 13°C to 26°C over this same period. The bloom persisted through 5 June with microcystins exceeding 22 μg/L MC-LR equivalents at the bloom peak. By 6 June, the river had returned to its muddy character following a rain event and sampling on 7 June detected only low levels of toxin (<0.6 μg/L) at public water systems located near the bloom origin. The elevated toxin production associated with this early onset bloom was without precedent for the Maumee River and an unique attribute of the cHAB was the high proportion of potentially-toxic genotypes. Whereas Planktothrix spp. is common in lotic environments, and has been previously detected in the Maumee, blooms are not commonly reported. This early onset, microcystin-producing cHAB provided a rare opportunity to glean insights into environmental factors that promote bloom development and dominance by Planktothrix in lotic environments.

LENGTH: 13 pages
External Partner Publication

Nitrogen cycling in Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie: oscillations between strong and weak export and implications for harmful algal blooms

EXT-1551
ABSTRACT:

Recent global water quality crises point to an urgent need for greater understanding of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cHABs) and their drivers. Nearshore areas of Lake Erie such as Sandusky Bay may become seasonally limited by nitrogen (N) and are characterized by distinct cHAB compositions (i.e., Planktothrix over Microcystis). This study investigated phytoplankton N uptake pathways, determined drivers of N depletion, and characterized the N budget in Sandusky Bay. Nitrate (NO3−) and ammonium (NH4+) uptake, N fixation, and N removal processes were quantified by stable isotopic approaches. Dissimilatory N reduction was a relatively modest N sink, with denitrification, anammox, and N2O production accounting for 84, 14, and 2% of sediment N removal, respectively. Phytoplankton assimilation was the dominant N uptake mechanism, and NO3− uptake rates were higher than NH4+ uptake rates. Riverine N loading was sometimes insufficient to meet assimilatory and dissimilatory demands, but N fixation alleviated this deficit. N fixation made up 23.7–85.4% of total phytoplankton N acquisition and indirectly supports Planktothrix blooms. However, N fixation rates were surprisingly uncorrelated with NO3− or NH4+ concentrations. Owing to temporal separation in sources and sinks of N to Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay oscillates between a conduit and a filter of downstream N loading to Lake Erie, delivering extensively recycled forms of N during periods of low export. Drowned river mouths such as Sandusky Bay are mediators of downstream N loading, but climate-change-induced increases in precipitation and N loading will likely intensify N export from these systems.

VOLUME: 15 LENGTH: 16 pages
External Partner Publication

Optimization of extraction methods for quantification of microcystin-LR and microcystin-RR in fish, vegetable, and soil matrices using UPLC–MS/MS

EXT-1546
ABSTRACT:

Human-driven environmental change has increased the occurrence of harmful cyanobacteria blooms in
aquatic ecosystems. Concomitantly, exposure to microcystin (MC), a cyanobacterial toxin that can
accumulate in animals, edible plants, and agricultural soils, has become a growing public health concern.
For accurate estimation of health risks and timely monitoring, availability of reliable detection methods is
imperative. Nonetheless, quantitative analysis of MCs in many types of biological and environmental
samples has proven challenging because matrix interferences can hinder sample preparation and extraction procedures, leading to poor MC recovery. Herein, controlled experiments were conducted to
enhance the use of ultra-performance liquid-chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS/
MS) to recover MC-LR and MC-RR at a range of concentrations in seafood (fish), vegetables (lettuce), and environmental (soil) matrices. Although these experiments offer insight into detailed technical aspects of the MC homogenization and extraction process (i.e., sonication duration and centrifugation speed during homogenization; elution solvent to use during the final extraction), they centered on identifying the best (1) solvent system to use during homogenization (2–3 tested per matrix) and (2) single-phase extraction (SPE) column type (3 tested) to use for the final extraction. The best procedure consisted of the following, regardless of sample type: centrifugation speed = 4200 xg; elution volume = 8 mL; elution solvent = 80% methanol; and SPE column type = hydrophilic–lipophilic balance (HLB), with carbon also being satisfactory for fish. For sonication, 2 min, 5 min, and 10 min were optimal for fish, lettuce, and soil matrices, respectively. Using the recommended HLB column, the solvent systems that led to the highest recovery of MCs were methanol:water:butanol for fish, methanol:water for lettuce, and EDTA-Na4P2O7
for soils. Given that the recommended procedures resulted in average MC-LR and MC-RR recoveries that
ranged 93 to 98%, their adoption for the preparation of samples with complex matrices before UPLC–MS/
MS analysis is encouraged.

VOLUME: 76 LENGTH: 10 pages
External Partner Publication

A History of Cooperative Lake Erie Fisheries Management

EXT-1561

Accompanying slides from Roger Knight’s presentation, A History of Cooperative Lake Erie Fisheries Management

External Partner Publication

So You Asked! Answers to Questions Received from Local Anglers

EXT-1562

Accompanying slides from Janice Kern’s “mailbag” style presentation, So You Asked! Answers to Questions Received from Local Anglers

External Partner Publication

Ohio's Lake Erie Fisheries 2018 Outlook

EXT-1560

Accompanying slides from Janice Kern’s presentation on Ohio’s Lake Erie Fisheries 2018 Outlook

External Partner Publication

Ohio's Lake Erie Fisheries Program: Monitoring and Management

EXT-1559

Accompanying slides from Travis Hartman’s presentation on Ohio’s Lake Erie Fisheries Program: Monitoring and Management

External Partner Publication

Effects of Harmful Algal Blooms on Walleye Vision

EXT-1556

Accompanying Slideshow from Chelsey Nieman and Suzanne Gray’s presentation on the effects of algal blooms on Walleye vision.

External Partner Publication

Out of Breath and Nowhere to Go: How Low Oxygen Zones Put the Squeeze on Fish Habitat

EXT-1558

Accompanying slides from Richard Kraus’s presentation, Out of Breath and Nowhere to Go: How Low Oxygen Zones Put the Squeeze on Fish Habitat

External Partner Publication

Maternal Effects in Lake Erie Walleye and Yellow Perch

EXT-1557

Accompanying slides from Elizabeth Marschall’s presentation, Maternal Effects in Lake Erie Walleye and Yellow Perch

External Partner Publication

Summary of Findings and Strategies to Move Toward a 40% Phosphorus Reduction

EXT-1545

White Paper: Summary of Findings and Strategies to Move Toward a 40% Phosphorus Reduction

LENGTH: 13 pages
External Partner Publication

Nitrification and ammonium dynamics in Taihu Lake, China: seasonal competition for ammonium between nitrifiers and cyanobacteria

EXT-1548
ABSTRACT:

Taihu Lake is hypereutrophic and experiences seasonal, cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms. These Microcystis blooms produce microcystin, a potent liver toxin, and are linked to anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loads to lakes. Microcystis spp. cannot fix atmospheric N and must compete with ammonia-oxidizing and other organisms for ammonium (NH4+). We measured NH4+ regeneration and potential uptake rates and total nitrification using stable-isotope techniques. Nitrification studies included abundance of the functional gene for NH4+ oxidation, amoA, for ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). Potential NH4+ uptake rates ranged from 0.02 to 6.80 µmol L−1 h−1 in the light and from 0.05 to 3.33 µmol L−1 h−1 in the dark, and NH4+ regeneration rates ranged from 0.03 to 2.37 µmol L−1 h−1. Nitrification rates exceeded previously reported rates in most freshwater systems. Total nitrification often exceeded 200 nmol L−1 d−1 and was  >  1000 nmol L−1 d−1 at one station near a river discharge. AOA amoA gene copies were more abundant than AOB gene copies (p <  0.005) at all times; however, only abundance of AOB amoA (not AOA) was correlated with nitrification rates for all stations and all seasons (p <  0.005). Nitrification rates in Taihu Lake varied seasonally; at most stations, rates were highest in March, lower in June, and lowest in July, corresponding with cyanobacterial bloom progression, suggesting that nitrifiers were poor competitors for NH4+ during the bloom.

Regeneration results suggested that cyanobacteria relied extensively on regenerated NH4+ to sustain the bloom. Internal NH4+ regeneration exceeded external N loading to the lake by a factor of 2 but was ultimately fueled by external N loads. Our results thus support the growing literature calling for watershed N loading reductions in concert with existing management of P loads.

VOLUME: 15 LENGTH: 15 pages
External Partner Publication

River sediment nitrogen removal and recycling within an agricultural Midwestern USA watershed

EXT-1550
ABSTRACT:

The Lower Great Miami River (LGMR) lies within the Mississippi River watershed and contributes to nutrient loads that promote seasonal hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Moreover, the LGMR has recently experienced algal blooms caused by excess N and P. To investigate N cycling in the LGMR, we incubated intact sediment cores with stable 15N isotope additions in a continuous-flow system. We measured sediment nutrient fluxes, N sinks and sources (denitrification/anammox and N fixation, respectively), and potential dissimilatory NO3 2 reduction to NH4 1 (DNRA) in spring and summer at 6 locations along a river reach (~50 km) influenced by urban and agricultural nutrient loads. LGMR sediments were a source of bioavailable NH4 and orthophosphate to river water. However, high denitrification rates resulted in LGMR sediments being a net sink for N in the river reach. NO3 2 amendments did not consistently stimulate denitrification, a result suggesting that denitrifiers were functioning at or near maximum rates. Anammox and DNRA were not consistently observed, and N fixation occurring simultaneously with denitrification was not observed. We estimate that denitrification in LGMR sediments removed 8 to 33% of external N loads to the river from the watershed, with the remainder exported downstream. This result indicates that denitrification can be an important N sink in the LGMR, but further decrease of external N inputs will be required to minimize eutrophication in the LGMR and N export to downstream systems.

VOLUME: 37 LENGTH: 11 pages
External Partner Publication

Great Lakes Commission-Ohio Sea Grant Fellowship 2018-2019

EXT-1544

Application and Award details for the 2018-2019 Great Lakes Commission-Ohio Sea Grant Fellowship.

External Partner Publication

Attached Algae: The Cryptic Base of Inverted Trophic Pyramids in Freshwaters

EXT-1553
ABSTRACT:

It seems improbable that a thin veneer of attached algae coating submerged surfaces in lakes and rivers could be the foundation of many freshwater food webs, but increasing evidence from chemical tracers supports this view. Attached algae grow on any submerged surface that receives enough light for photosynthesis, but animals often graze attached algae down to thin, barely perceptible biofilms. Algae in general are more nutritious and digestible than terrestrial plants or detritus, and attached algae are particularly harvestable, being concentrated on surfaces. Diatoms, a major component of attached algal assemblages, are especially nutritious and tolerant of heavy grazing. Algivores can track attached algal productivity over a range of spatial scales and consume a high proportion of new attached algal growth in high-light, low-nutrient ecosystems. The subsequent efficient conversion of the algae into consumer production in freshwater food webs can lead to low-producer, high-consumer biomass, patterns that Elton (1927) described as inverted trophic pyramids. Human perturbations of nutrient, sediment, and carbon loading into freshwaters and of thermal and hydrologic regimes can weaken consumer control of algae and promote nuisance attached algal blooms.

External Partner Publication

2017 HABs Using Bateria to Degrade Microcystin (Huntley)

EXT-1543

Jason Huntley explores how we might be able to use bacteria to help deal with harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie.

External Partner Publication

2017 HABs Maumee Nutrient Loading (Johnson)

EXT-1542

Laura Johnson’s presentation on Nutrient Loading in the Maumee River.

External Partner Publication

2017 HABs Lake Erie HABs Forecast System (Kavanaugh)

EXT-1541

Slideshow explaining NOAA’s Harmful Algal Bloom Forecast System.

External Partner Publication

2017 HABs Fish Safe To Eat (Ludsin)

EXT-1540

Dr. Stuart Ludsin tests whether toxins from Lake Erie harmful algal blooms can make fish from Lake Erie dangerous to eat. (tl;dr it’s safe as long as you stick to the recommended amount)

External Partner Publication

2017 HABs BMPs Lake Erie Basin (LaBarge)

EXT-1539

George LaBarge gives recommendations for best management practices regarding farms near the West Basin of Lake Erie.

External Partner Publication

2017 HABs Forecast Western Lake Erie (Stumpf, Johnson)

EXT-1537

A detailed slideshow showing the 2017 Lake Erie harmful algal bloom forecast and data.

External Partner Publication

Community Biological Ammonium Demand: A Conceptual Model for Cyanobacteria Blooms in Eutrophic Lakes

EXT-1547
ABSTRACT:

Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (Cyano-HABs) are enhanced by anthropogenic pressures, including excessive nutrient (nitrogen, N, and phosphorus, P) inputs and a warming climate. Severe eutrophication in aquatic systems is often manifested as non-N2-fixing CyanoHABs (e.g., Microcystis spp.), but the biogeochemical relationship between N inputs/dynamics and CyanoHABs needs definition. Community biological ammonium (NH4+) demand (CBAD) relates N dynamics to total microbial productivity and NH4+ deprivation in aquatic systems. A mechanistic conceptual model was constructed by combining nutrient cycling and CBAD observations from a spectrum of lakes to assess N cycling interactions with CyanoHABs. Model predictions were supported with CBAD data from a Microcystis bloom in Maumee Bay, Lake Erie, during summer 2015. Nitrogen compounds are transformed to reduced, more bioavailable forms (e.g., NH4+ and urea) favored by CyanoHABs. During blooms, algal biomass increases faster than internal NH4+ regeneration rates, causing high CBAD values. High turnover rates from cell death and remineralization of labile organic matter consume oxygen and enhance denitrification. These processes drive eutrophic systems to NH4+ limitation or colimitation under warm, shallow conditions and support the need for dual nutrient (N and P) control.

VOLUME: 51 LENGTH: 8 pages
External Partner Publication

Old Habits are Hard to Break: Modern HABs, Nitrogen, Lake Management

EXT-1549

Researchers Dr. Mark J. McCarthy, Justin A. Myers, and Dr. Silvia E. Newell discuss the roles that nitrogen and phosphorous play in creating harmful algal blooms, methods for tracking Nitrogen, and ways to reduce their loading into water sources, thus reducing harmful algal blooms (HABs).

LENGTH: 3 pages
External Partner Publication

Asian Carp PowerPoint Presentation

EXT-1536

This powerpoint provides detailed information on the 4 species of invasive Asian carp (grass carp, black carp, bighead carp, silver carp) and the dangers they pose to local ecosystems.

LENGTH: 50 pages
External Partner Publication

Shipboard Science Workshop Detailed Flyer 2017

EXT-1535

Detailed description and information on the 2017 Shipboard Science workshop.

LENGTH: 2 pages
External Partner Publication

Shipboard Science Workshop Brief Flyer 2017

EXT-1534

information on the 2017 Shipboard Science workshop on Lake Huron.

LENGTH: 1 page
External Partner Publication

Winter Program 2017 Parking Pass

EXT-1533

Winter Program 2017 Parking Pass

External Partner Publication

Spill Response Requirements and Regional Capacity: Regulations and Resources Fact Sheet

EXT-1532

Spill Response Requirements and Regional Capacity: Regulations and Resources

External Partner Publication

Thinking Outside the Lake: how can management efforts benefit Western Lake Erie and its tributaries?

EXT-1531

Thinking Outside the Lake: how can management efforts benefit Western Lake Erie and its tributaries?

External Partner Publication

Lake Erie HABs: Nutrient Cause and Effect

EXT-1530

Lake Erie HABs: Nutrient Cause and Effect

External Partner Publication

Outreach to the Ag Community: Understanding the Nutrient-HAB Linkage and Solutions

EXT-1529

Outreach to the Ag Community: Understanding the Nutrient-HAB Linkage and Solutions

External Partner Publication

Western Lake Erie Basin Initiative: Overview and Update

EXT-1528

Western Lake Erie Basin Initiative: Overview and Update

External Partner Publication

Farmer BMP Adoption: Possible Futures and the Efficacy Gap

EXT-1527

Farmer BMP Adoption: Possible Futures and the Efficacy Gap

External Partner Publication

The Heidelberg Tributary Loading Program: Keeping a Finger on the Pulse of Ohio’s Watersheds

EXT-1526

The Heidelberg Tributary Loading Program: Keeping a Finger on the Pulse of Ohio’s Watersheds

External Partner Publication
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