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Technical Summaries

Technical Summaries based on Sea Grant research findings and written for a non-technical audience

Technical Summaries are based on Sea Grant research findings and are written for non-technical audiences.


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HOLMES COUNTY, OHIO WAGE AND BENEFIT ANALYSIS REPORT

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HOLMES COUNTY, OHIO WAGE AND BENEFIT ANALYSIS REPORT

This report summarizes the results of the Holmes County compensation study, commissioned by the Holmes County Economic Development Council, funded by the Holmes County Commissioners, and conducted by Ohio State University Extension. A web-based survey was administered during the fall of 2023 that included wage and benefit data for 40 occupations. A total of 121 businesses participated in the survey.

The researchers gathered data from human resource managers or similar administrators. The survey questions asked respondents to provide information related to wages, benefits, and other forms of compensation.

City of Perrysburg: Business Retention & Expansion Program Final Report

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City of Perrysburg: Business Retention & Expansion Program Final Report

The City of Perrysburg and the Perrysburg Area Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with Ohio State University Extension, the Ohio Sea Grant College Program, and Reveille Ltd. implemented a city-wide Business Retention andExpansion (BRE) program to gauge the perceptions and concerns of the business community in the City of Perrysburg. The retention of existing businesses has been and remains a primary goal of the City of Perrysburg, elected leaders and the Perrysburg Area Chamber of Commerce. Enhancing the ability of area businesses to profitably grow and expand is vital to sustaining and improving local economic viability.

City-wide BRE programs were facilitated sporadically in Perrysburg (2017 and 2020), but the City of Perrysburg understands the program needs to become an annual occurrence. BRE is seen as a staple for municipal, county, regional, and statewide economic development organizations
across the United States. The best “barometers” of how well a community functions as a place to do business and a place to live and work are the state of existing businesses and the existing workforce. Research shows that in Ohio, an average net job growth of 70% comes from existing
businesses, and that number increases to as high as 86% in rural areas.1
The success and growth of existing businesses support a larger tax base, increased local spending, enhanced public services, and an overall better quality of life. Strong local businesses also play a major role in the attraction of new business to an area. Satisfied existing business
leaders serve as a community’s best ambassadors to recruit new firms as well as a source of leads when seeking new firms to recruit.

Ohio's Marina Industry Business Retention & Expansion Initiative

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Ohio's Marina Industry Business Retention & Expansion Initiative

Retention of existing businesses and community encouragement of local firms’ continued growth has become an essential aspect of many local and regional economic development programs. While attraction of new businesses is a highly visible aspect of most economic development programs, studies have shown that businesses which already exist in a community account for up to 70% of all net change in local employment, and up to 86% in rural areas.

Existing businesses success allows for a strong tax base, increased local spending, enhanced public services, and an overall better quality of life. Additionally, strong local businesses play a key role in the attraction of new business to the area. Satisfied existing businesses can serve as a community’s best ambassadors when recruiting new firms as well as being a source of leads when seeking new firms to recruit.

Recognizing the importance of local marinas, the Lake Erie Marine Trades Association and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Office of Coastal Management in conjunction with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Sea Grant College Program established a BRE (Business Retention & Expansion) Program to assist these companies in achieving their growth objectives and to improve the overall business environment of Ohio’s Lake Erie Marina industry and Ohio’s inland lakes to obtain the most diverse representation from marinas across Ohio.

Ohio’s Lake Erie Charter Fishing Industry in 2020

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Ohio’s Lake Erie Charter Fishing Industry in 2020
ABSTRACT:

Lake Erie is the shallowest, southernmost and warmest of the Great Lakes. These characteristics combine to make it the most biologically productive, supporting abundant fish stocks including popular sport fish species such as Walleye and Yellow Perch. Ohio’s Lake Erie coast offers great access for recreational anglers, including a robust and economically important charter fishing industry.

However, environmental conditions, economic climate and individual angler behaviors may all change over time. These changes could also impact the charter fishing industry. In early 2021, all captains who were licensed fishing guides during the 2020 season were invited to participate in an electronic survey. The first contact was by mail, followed by three reminder emails. The population of captains that received the survey was 787 and the response rate was 46%. This was the eighth survey of the Ohio Lake Erie charter fishing industry since 1985. The goal was to gauge the attitudes, characteristics and economic impacts of the industry for the 2020 season and document any changes from previous surveys. This information can be useful to captains, resource managers, local communities and decision makers assessing the health and needs of the industry.

The H2Ohio Wetland Monitoring Program

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The H2Ohio Wetland Monitoring Program

The H2Ohio Wetland Monitoring Program is assessing how wetland restoration can improve water quality, with a focus on phosphorus and nitrogen, key nutrients that fuel eutrophication and harmful algal blooms across Ohio. The ODNR-implemented wetland projects, part of the H2Ohio Initiative, represent a wide range of wetland types, restoration and construction approaches, and complexity.

To improve wetland design and management into the future, it’s necessary to understand the processes happening within wetlands. This comprehensive approach to determining not only whether a wetland is effective, but also how the wetland systems work, is led by expert scientists from across Ohio.

Tipping Point Planner Community Workshop Report, Ottawa County Ohio

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Tipping Point Planner Community Workshop Report, Ottawa County Ohio

Ottawa County, Ohio is situated on the coast of western Lake Erie. This area was identified by the US EPA’s US-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement as an Area of Concern. With the goal of assisting with engagement on land use and tourism concerns related to the development of a new strategic plan for the Ottawa County Improvement Corporation, Ohio Sea Grant, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant partnered with the Ottawa County Improvement Corporation (OCIC) to hold a Tipping Point Planner (TPP) workshop. Through collaboration with Reveille LTD, a local planning consultancy, and OCIC, Ottawa County as a whole was identified as a focus area. In total, over 50 people participated in the two-day workshop.

Ohio Sea Grant, Reveille LTD, and the OCIC led the development of a steering committee which included key stakeholders from county departments, elected officials, and the public. The steering committee identified two key focus areas of focus for the workshop: Land Use Planning, Development, Open Space and Nature-Based Solutions; and Lake Fish Populations and Water Quality: Implications for Tourism and Recreation.

LENGTH: 48 pages

Ohio Clean Marinas Industrial SWPPP Template

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Ohio Clean Marinas Industrial SWPPP Template

To help you develop a SWPPP that is consistent with Ohio EPA’s Industrial Storm Water General Permit “MSGP” (OHR000006), Ohio EPA has created this Industrial SWPPP Template (or, “the Template”). Use of the Template will help ensure that your SWPPP addresses all the necessary elements required in Part 5 of OHR000006.

LENGTH: 19 pages

Ottawa County, OH Business Retention and Expansion Program Final Report June 2022

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Ottawa County, OH Business Retention and Expansion Program Final Report June 2022

The Ottawa County Community Improvement Corporation (OCIC), in partnership with Ohio State University Extension, the Ohio Sea Grant College Program, Reveille Ltd. and all chambers of commerce in Ottawa County (Port Clinton, Put-in-Bay, Lakeside-Marblehead, Oak Harbor, Genoa and Elmore) implemented a county-wide Business Retention and Expansion (BRE) program to gauge the perceptions and concerns of the business community in Ottawa County. The retention of existing businesses has been and remains a primary goal of the OCIC, elected leaders and chambers of commerce in Ottawa County. Enhancing the ability of area businesses to profitably grow and expand is vital to sustaining and improving local economic viability.

LENGTH: 58 pages

Additional Q&A for 2022 Virtual Ohio Charter Captains Conference

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Additional Q&A for 2022 Virtual Ohio Charter Captains Conference

Additional Q&A for 2022 Virtual Ohio Charter Captains Conference

Event Archive

LENGTH: 1 page

Ohio Agritourism Report

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Ohio Agritourism Report

Agritourism farms are growing in number across the United States (Noyes, 2015), accounting for nearly $1 billion in sales according to the 2017 Census of Agriculture.

To better understand this industry in Ohio, a statewide industry survey was created and then sent out for agritourism farm owners and operators to complete in Summer 2021. This report represents findings of an initial effort with the agritourism industry in Ohio, designed to better understand the industry and potential programmatic opportunities. Note that survey findings represent data shared by respondents only. While conclusions and implications can be drawn from these data to the respondents as a group, respondent data are not generalizable to the agritourism industry in Ohio, overall.

As a result of the pandemic, operations adapted in 2020 included the use of online ticketing, reducing the number of events and visitor capacity, and increasing attention to health and sanitation. Interestingly, gross revenue exceeded previous levels in 2020 for most operations, and direct sales were the leading sales category of the five categories surveyed. As far as jobs, full-time year-round employment was reported as minimal. Most operations reported 10 or fewer seasonal employees. With respect to ways in which Extension could best support the agritourism industry, assistance with marketing via social media and websites was identified most frequently. Assistance via strategic planning and using trend research to inform decision making was also noted by many.

LENGTH: 13 pages

The H2Ohio Wetland Monitoring Program

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The H2Ohio Wetland Monitoring Program

The H2Ohio Wetland Monitoring Program will assess the impacts that wetland restoration can have on removal of phosphorus and nitrogen, key nutrients that fuel eutrophication and harmful algal blooms, across Ohio. The ODNR-implemented wetland projects that are part of the H2Ohio Initiative represent a wide range of wetland types, construction approaches, and complexity.

To improve wetland restoration design and management into the future, it’s necessary to understand the processes happening within wetlands. This comprehensive approach to determining not only whether a wetland is effective, but also how the wetland systems work and how to better design and manage wetlands for nutrient removal, is led by scientists from throughout Ohio with expertise in wetland ecology, nutrient biogeochemistry, hydrology, plant sampling and identification, soil science, data synthesis and analysis.

LENGTH: 1 page

Collaborative Watershed Management in the Cuyahoga River Area of Concern: An Institutional Analysis

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Collaborative Watershed Management in the Cuyahoga River Area of Concern:  An Institutional Analysis

This report summarizes the findings of an applied research project conducted by the Ohio Sea Grant College Program (OSG) in the spring of 2020. The project examines collaborative environmental management in the Cuyahoga River Area of Concern (AOC), focusing on the biophysical nature of the river system, the reciprocal nature of local culture on river restoration activities, and institutional rules governing decision-making within the watershed. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of the Cuyahoga AOC Advisory Committee and one alternate member (hereafter referred to as the “Advisory Committee”) to gather data on the decision-making processes and collaborative relationships that shape management actions in the watershed, and to solicit recommendations on how to achieve sustainable outcomes. The results should be helpful to identify and overcome common transaction costs associated with collaborative environmental management and inform the way the Advisory Committee shares information, coordinates activities, agrees on conservation strategies, and supports management actions approved by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA).

City of Perrysburg COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact Survey

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City of Perrysburg COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact Survey

The current COVID-19 pandemic is having an obvious negative effect on businesses. To document the true effects of the pandemic on Perrysburg businesses, the Ohio State University Extension and Ohio Sea Grant College Program partnered with the City of Perrysburg and Reveille Ltd. to conduct a business impact survey to determine the issues that these businesses are facing.

The following is an analysis of the local business impact survey that was conducted from April -June 2020. Businesses were asked questions regarding the industry in which they were operating, level of business closures, operating capacity and procedures, employment levels, finances, and concerns for the future.

LENGTH: 18 pages

Village of Archbold COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact Survey

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Village of Archbold COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact Survey

The current COVID-19 pandemic is having an obvious negative effect on businesses. To document the true effects of the pandemic on Archbold businesses, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Sea Grant College Program partnered with the Village of Archbold and Reveille Ltd. to conduct a business impact survey to determine the issues that these businesses are facing.

The following is an analysis of the local business impact survey that was conducted from April -June 2020. Businesses were asked questions regarding the industry in which they were operating, level of business closures, operating capacity and procedures, employment levels, finances, and concerns for the future.

LENGTH: 18 pages

City of Northwood COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact Survey

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City of Northwood COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact Survey

The current COVID-19 pandemic is having an obvious negative effect on businesses. To document the true effects of the pandemic on Northwood businesses, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Sea Grant College Program partnered with the City of Northwood and Reveille Ltd. to conduct a business impact survey to determine the issues that these businesses are facing.

The following is an analysis of the local business impact survey that was conducted from April -June 2020. Businesses were asked questions regarding the industry in which they were operating, level of business closures, operating capacity and procedures, employment levels, finances, and concerns for the future.

LENGTH: 18 pages

Bring Your Own Bag

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Bring Your Own Bag

Ohio Sea Grant, with support from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, conducted two linked research projects from 2016-2020 that informed a comprehensive education and outreach campaign designed to reduce plastic pollution in the environment.

LENGTH: 4 pages

Public Perception Around Use of Reusable Bags During the COVID-19 Global Health Pandemic: Preliminary Summary Report

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Public Perception Around Use of Reusable Bags During the COVID-19 Global Health Pandemic: Preliminary Summary Report
ABSTRACT:

As the world experienced the COVID-19 global health pandemic, the use of reusable items such as bags for shopping changed. Huge steps have been taken over the past few years in the United States to limit the use of single-use plastic grocery bags. Bag bans or fees have been instituted at state and local levels around the country. People are remembering to bring their own bag into the store or refusing a bag and hand carrying their items. However, this all changed in the spring of 2020. Stores that once encouraged people to bring their own bags into the store were putting up signs telling customers to leave their bags in the car. Cities that implemented disposable bag bans or fees paused such legislation. This study was conducted to get feedback from the general public to determine how they feel about only being allowed to use disposable bags.

Tracking Fish Contamination in the Great Lakes

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Tracking Fish Contamination in the Great Lakes

The directive of the Great Lakes Fish Monitoring Surveillance Program (GLFMSP) is to look for toxic chemicals in top predator fish of the Great Lakes, such as lake trout and walleye, which play an important role in Lake Erie’s multi-million-dollar sport fishing industry. The program’s scientists monitor changes in the accumulation of toxic chemicals in the food web as a result of changing regulations on, for example, cancer-causing compounds like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCB concentrations have been decreasing since the late 1970s, when their production was banned in the United States. The monitoring program has mapped this trend and laid the groundwork for many other toxin monitoring programs in the U.S.

LENGTH: 1 page

Eighty Years of Tiny Lake Erie Critters

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Eighty Years of Tiny Lake Erie Critters

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been collecting information on Lake Erie benthos – the mollusks, snails and worms that live in sediments on the lake bottom – since the 1930s. Many of these organisms are considered indicators of how healthy an ecosystem is, so determining changes and trends over time can help management agencies like the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate and track the effectiveness of protection strategies and regulations.

LENGTH: 1 page

Studying the Channels that Connect the Great Lakes

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Studying the Channels that Connect the Great Lakes

Ecological monitoring is an essential part of managing ecosystems in the 21st century: it helps track changes due to human impacts, assesses pollution and efforts to clean it up, and offers insight into the intricate relationships between living things, both in the monitored area and in general. Scientific monitoring techniques can easily be applied to different regions of the world, but sometimes it’s important to take a step back and make sure that the approach that makes sense for one study is still producing desired results in a different environment. Scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Office of Research and Development do just that: working on the basic science of developing and testing new sampling methods and making sure techniques used in one environment work just as well in another setting.

LENGTH: 1 page

Local Surveillance, Global Conclusions

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Local Surveillance, Global Conclusions

In the Great Lakes, the Great Lakes Sediment Surveillance Program (GLSSP) is one of those efforts. Started in 2010 as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), the program completed sampling in all five Great Lakes, and analyzed more than 1,000 sediment samples for a wide range of organic pollutants.

LENGTH: 1 page

Surveying the Lakescape

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Surveying the Lakescape

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Lake Erie Biological Station in Sandusky, along with researchers from a wide range of universities, other government agencies and private companies, collected information on a variety of information about Lake Erie, from nutrient content to fish diets and everything in between. The survey, which takes a more comprehensive look at the overall ecosystem instead of focusing on smaller aspects of it, provides baseline data for management efforts and further research into the health and protection of Lake Erie.

LENGTH: 1 page

Tracking Oxygen in Lake Erie’s Central Basin

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Tracking Oxygen in Lake Erie’s Central Basin

Researchers from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitored water movement and oxygen concentrations at the 14-16 meter depth, where it’s most likely for hypoxic water to intrude into shallower areas with normal oxygen concentrations. Organisms that live there aren’t adapted for those lower oxygen levels, so it’s also where those intrusions can have serious negative impacts on aquatic life that can’t survive these conditions for more than a few minutes.

LENGTH: 1 page

Mercury in the Great Lakes: Possibly Not Where You Think You’ll Find It

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Mercury in the Great Lakes: Possibly Not Where You Think You’ll Find It

Mercury is a globally dispersed pollutant, as many industrial processes discharge mercury into the atmosphere, where air currents help it travel to every corner of the world. It has been known to cause problems in the Great Lakes for about 50 years, but has been understudied in the past, in part because sample collection and analysis of mercury in anything but fish is extremely difficult to do without contaminating the sample.

LENGTH: 1 page

Mussels Can Say A Lot About Environmental Concerns

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Mussels Can Say A Lot About Environmental Concerns

NOAA’s Mussel Watch Program has been in operation since 1986, when it was designed to monitor the status and trends of a broad suite of chemical contaminants at sites that represented large coastal areas in order to construct a nationwide assessment. In 1992 the Great Lakes were added to this monitoring effort, and involvement with CSMI and funding under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) helped the program ramp up its efforts in 2010.

LENGTH: 1 page

Watching Mussels Grow: More Important Than You May Think

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Watching Mussels Grow: More Important Than You May Think

Researchers at SUNY Buffalo State’s Great Lakes Center are monitoring life at the bottom of the Great Lakes to see how environmental changes such as pollution and harmful algal blooms affect these organisms.

LENGTH: 1 page

Phosphorus in Lake Erie Sediments Contributes Little to Harmful Algal Blooms

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Phosphorus in Lake Erie Sediments Contributes Little to Harmful Algal Blooms

Some people may be worried about how much phosphorus is already found in the lake, bound to sediments on the lake bottom. Is there already so much phosphorus in the lake that it’s too late to fix the problem so blooms will continue regardless of efforts to reduce runoff from the land? Turns out that’s not likely.

LENGTH: 1 page

Business Retention and Expansion Program, Oregon Ohio

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Business Retention and Expansion Program, Oregon Ohio
ABSTRACT:

Retention of existing businesses and community encouragement of local firms’ continued growth
has become an essential aspect of many local and regional economic development programs.
While attraction of new businesses is a highly visible aspect of most economic development
programs, studies have shown that businesses that already exist in a community account for up
to 70% of all net change in local employment, and up to 86% in rural areas.
1
Recognizing the importance of local firms, the Oregon Economic Development Foundation
and Eastern Maumee Bay Chamber of Commerce, in conjunction with Ohio State
University Extension and the Ohio Sea Grant College Program established a Business
Retention and Expansion (BRE) Program to assist these firms in achieving their growth objectives
and to improve the overall business environment in Oregon, Ohio.

Charter Boat Captains Help Monitor Lake Erie Water Quality

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Charter Boat Captains Help Monitor Lake Erie Water Quality

Monitoring the health of Lake Erie is no small task, and it can’t be done alone. That’s why Stone Lab works with private charter captains on the lake to help collect water samples and monitor the algae and toxin levels in the water.

LENGTH: 1 page

Business Retention and Expansion Program, Perrysburg Ohio

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Business Retention and Expansion Program, Perrysburg Ohio
ABSTRACT:

Retention of existing businesses and
community encouragement of local
firms’ continued growth has become
an essential aspect of many local
and regional economic development
programs. While attraction of new
businesses is a highly visible aspect
of most economic development
programs, studies have shown that
businesses that already exist in a
community account for up to 70% of
all net change in local employment,
and up to 86% in rural areas.1

Recognizing the importance of local
firms, the City of Perrysburg, in
conjunction with Ohio State
University Extension and the
Ohio Sea Grant College Program
established a Business Retention
and Expansion (BRE) Program to
assist these firms in achieving their
growth objectives and to improve the
overall business environment in
Perrysburg, Ohio.

Needs Assessment Report: Barriers and Benefits to Desired Behaviors for Single-Use Plastic Items in Northeast Ohio’s Lake Erie Basin

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Needs Assessment Report: Barriers and Benefits to Desired Behaviors for Single-Use Plastic Items in Northeast Ohio’s Lake Erie Basin
This report summarizes the a marine debris analysis conducted by the Ohio Sea Grant College Program in the fall of 2016.
LENGTH: 24 pages

Western Lake Erie Wildlife Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Develops Models to Better Protect the Lake Erie Watershed from Nutrient and Sediment Runoff

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Western Lake Erie Wildlife Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Develops Models to Better Protect the Lake Erie Watershed from Nutrient and Sediment Runoff

A full assessment of the impacts of current conservations efforts on the western Lake Erie basin and a suggestion of what more needs to be done for the health of the lake and associate waterways.

LENGTH: 1 page

Lake County Agri-business Business Retention and Expansion Program

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Lake County Agri-business Business Retention and Expansion Program
ABSTRACT:

Retention of existing businesses and community encouragement of local firms’ continued
growth has become an essential aspect of many local and regional economic development
programs. While attraction of new businesses is a highly visible aspect of most economic
development programs, studies have shown that businesses which already exist in a
community account for up to 70% of all net change in local employment, and up to 86% in
rural areas.
1
“Not only does the success of existing businesses allow for a strong tax base, increased local
spending, enhanced public services, and an overall better quality of life, but strong local
businesses also play a major role in the attraction of new business to an area. Satisfied existing
businesses can serve as a community’s best ambassadors when recruiting new firms as well as
being a source of leads when seeking new firms to recruit.”2
Recognizing the importance of local agricultural businesses, the Lake County Soil and
Water Conservation District, in conjunction with Ohio State University Extension, the Ohio Sea
Grant College Program, Lake County Development Council and Lake County Farm Bureau
established a Business Retention and Expansion (BRE) Program to assist these companies in
achieving their growth objectives and to improve the overall business environment of Lake
County’s agricultural and nursery industry.

Citizen Science At Work: Charter Boat Captains Help Monitor Lake Erie Water Quality in 2014 and 2015

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Citizen Science At Work: Charter Boat Captains Help Monitor Lake Erie Water Quality in 2014 and 2015

Lake Erie is large, and it’s hard for one organization, even Stone Lab, to monitor the whole lake. That’s why Stone Lab works with Lake Erie charter captains to collect samples from all over the lake to help us monitor water quality.

LENGTH: 1 page

Business Retention and Expansion Program, Fremont Ohio

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Business Retention and Expansion Program, Fremont Ohio
ABSTRACT:

Retention of existing businesses and
community encouragement of local
firms’ continued growth has become
an essential aspect of many local
and regional economic development
programs. While attraction of new
businesses is a highly visible aspect
of most economic development
programs, studies have shown that
businesses that already exist in a
community account for up to 70% of
all net change in local employment,
and up to 86% in rural areas.
1
Recognizing the importance of local
firms, the City of Fremont, in
conjunction with Ohio State
University Extension and the
Ohio Sea Grant College Program
established a Business Retention
and Expansion (BRE) Program to
assist these firms in achieving their
growth objectives and to improve the
overall business environment in the
City of Fremont, Ohio.

Business Retention and Expansion Program, Oregon Ohio

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Business Retention and Expansion Program, Oregon Ohio
ABSTRACT:

Retention of existing businesses and
community encouragement of local
firms’ continued growth has become
an essential aspect of many local
and regional economic development
programs. While attraction of new
businesses is a highly visible aspect
of most economic development
programs, studies have shown that
businesses that already exist in a
community account for up to 70% of
all net change in local employment,
and up to 86% in rural areas.
1
Recognizing the importance of local
firms, the Oregon Economic
Development Foundation in
conjunction with Ohio State
University Extension and the
Ohio Sea Grant College Program
established a Business Retention
and Expansion (BRE) Program to
assist these firms in achieving their
growth objectives and to improve the
overall business environment in the
City of Oregon, Ohio.

The Economic Resilience of Coastal Communities: Survey Results from Interviews with Local Leaders

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The Economic Resilience of Coastal Communities: Survey Results from Interviews with Local Leaders
ABSTRACT:

This report summarizes the main findings from a survey of 61 local leaders from the Ohio Lake Erie Watershed, half of whom come from municipal governments. Other respondents are at higher levels of government or in the private and nonprofit sectors. These leaders hold various positions of leadership in their organizations, such as the mayor or city manager, agency director, or commissioner. In an open question, we asked the respondents to list their three biggest threats to economic growth in their local communities. Economic concerns such as unemployment and business closures were mentioned by 60 percent of respondents, but almost half indicated that lack of leadership and governmental barriers are threats to economic stability and growth. Another third noted concerns regarding the natural or physical environment. All but two respondents were either “very” or “somewhat” worried about the threats posed by their top concern. Local leaders were also asked numerous questions about their policy responses to the threats listed. A wide variety of approaches are utilized, and the top approach, business programs and incentives, were the first listed approach of only 20 percent of respondents. Notably, around 11 percent also claimed that nothing is being done to address the threats. More specifically, respondents were asked to categorize their approaches to business attraction. Almost one-third pursue a passive “reactive-focused” approach that involves catering to whatever businesses show interest in the community. Only 11 percent report that their primary attraction approach is to attempt to diversify their economies by attracting businesses in industries that are in different industries than those that currently drive their local economies.

Finally, respondents were asked about their approaches to business retention. By far, the most common approach (one-third of responses) involved fostering an open dialogue with local business owners. Again, around 11 percent reported doing nothing to address the threats.

Ohio's Lake Erie Marina Industry Business Retention & Expansion Program 2015 Final Report

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Ohio's Lake Erie Marina Industry Business Retention & Expansion Program 2015 Final Report

Summary of program to assist marinas in achieving their growth objectives and to improve the overall business environment of Ohio’s Lake Erie Marina Industry.

ABSTRACT:

The Ohio Sea Grant College Program partnered with state-wide agencies to examine the needs of Ohio’s Lake Erie Marina Industry through a Business Retention and Expansion (BR&E) survey. The survey of existing marina businesses along Ohio’s Lake Erie coastline was a component of a multi-county BR&E program that encompassed Lucas, Ottawa, Erie, Lorain, Cuyahoga, Lake and Ashtabula counties. It was part of an on-going economic development effort to stabilize and grow the local economy and improve quality of life. As a result of the business retention and expansion program conducted in 2014-2015, Ohio Sea Grant, the Lake Erie Marine Trades Association and Ohio Department of Natural Resources Office of Coastal Management learned that Ohio’s Lake Erie Marina Industry plans to retain between 566-1,011 jobs with the intent of creating approximately 26-41 new jobs in the next year as a result of business expansion. Moreover, 26-41 new jobs in Ohio’s Lake Erie Marina Industry has the potential to create an additional $52,349 in local income tax collection and add approximately $1,247,015 in personal income to Ohio’s Lake Erie coastal communities.

Ohio’s Lake Erie Marina Industry Business Retention & Expansion Program 2015 Final Report

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Ohio’s Lake Erie Marina Industry Business Retention & Expansion Program 2015 Final Report
ABSTRACT:

Retention of existing businesses and community encouragement of local firms’ continued growth has become an essential aspect of many local and regional economic development programs. While attraction of new businesses is a highly visible aspect of most economic development programs, studies have shown that businesses which already exist in a community account for up to 70% of all net change in local employment, and up to 86% in rural areas.1 Existing businesses success allows for a strong tax base, increased local spending, enhanced public services, and an overall better quality of life. Additionally, strong local businesses play a major role in the attraction of new business to the area. Satisfied existing businesses can serve as a community’s best ambassadors when recruiting new firms as well as being a source of leads when seeking new firms to recruit.2 Recognizing the importance of local marinas, the Lake Erie Marine Trades Association and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Office of Coastal Management in conjunction with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Sea Grant College Program established a BRE (Business Retention & Expansion) Program to assist these companies in achieving their growth objectives and to improve the overall business environment of Ohio’s Lake Erie Marina Industry.

Retail Market Analysis, Shelby County Ohio

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Retail Market Analysis, Shelby County Ohio

The retail market analysis for Shelby County, Ohio compares this county to its broader Market Region. This regional approach is used to
understand the retail economy of Shelby County.
Recognizing that the residents of Shelby County purchase retail goods in retail centers or areas other than Shelby County, a larger Market Region was developed.

Modeling the Secondary Spread of Invasive Species by Ballast Water in the Laurentian Great Lakes

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Modeling the Secondary Spread of Invasive Species by Ballast Water in the Laurentian Great Lakes

Accompanying slides from Jessica Sherman’s presentation titled “Modeling the Secondary Spread of Invasive Species by Ballast Water in the Laurentian Great Lakes” based off of a paper of the same name.

LENGTH: 74 pages

Local Policy and Resilience: Results from a Survey of Local Leaders in Coastal Ohio

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Local Policy and Resilience: Results from a Survey of Local Leaders in Coastal Ohio

Accompanying slides from Lathania Brown and Robert Greenbaum’s presentation titled “Local Policy and Resilience: Results from a Survey of Local Leaders in Coastal Ohio”

Retail Market Analysis, Medina Ohio

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Retail Market Analysis, Medina Ohio
ABSTRACT:

The retail market analysis for the City of Medina, Ohio compares this city to its broader market region. This regional approach is used to understand the Medina retail economy. Recognizing that the
residents of Medina purchase retail goods in retail centers other than Medina, a larger market region was developed.

Copper Concentrations at Lake Erie Marinas

OHSU-TS-1500
Copper Concentrations at Lake Erie Marinas

Summary of a Clean Marinas project evaluating the impact of copper-based boat paint on sediments near Lake Erie marinas.

ABSTRACT:

The Ohio Clean Marinas Program, with a grant from the Ohio Lake Erie Commission’s Lake Erie Protection Fund, performed a study on copper concentrations at Lake Erie marinas. In collaboration with Bowling Green State University and Lake Erie marinas, data was collected on copper accumulation in sediment over the course of one boating season. The results will aid scientists, agencies, marina owners, and boaters in obtaining a better picture of the contribution of boat bottom wash wastewater to copper concentrations in Lake Erie nearshore sediments, and in finding sustainable solutions for boat bottom washing.

LENGTH: 2 pages

Business Retention and Expansion Program, Point Place Ohio

OHSU-TS-1535
Business Retention and Expansion Program, Point Place Ohio
ABSTRACT:

Retention of existing businesses
and community encouragement of
local firms’ continued growth has
become an essential aspect of
many local and regional economic
development programs. While
attraction of new businesses is a
highly visible aspect of most
economic development programs,
studies have shown that
businesses that already exist in a
community account for up to 80%
of all net change in local
employment, and up to 90% in rural
areas (Kraybill, 2001).
Recognizing the importance of local
firms, the Point Place Business
Association in partnership with
Ohio State University Extension
and the Ohio Sea Grant College
Program established a Business
Retention and Expansion (BRE)
Program to assist these firms in
achieving their growth objectives
and to improve the overall business
environment in the Point Place
neighborhood area of Toledo,
Ohio.

Yellow Perch & Climate Change: How will a changing climate affect Lake Erie yellow perch?

OHSU-TS-1503
Yellow Perch & Climate Change: How will a changing climate affect Lake Erie yellow perch?

PowerPoint module to incorporate into presentations

ABSTRACT:

This presentation is based on research and information provided by Dr. Stuart Ludsin at Ohio State University. More background information is available from Dr. Ludsin’s Global Change, Local Impact webinar and from “Fishing for Change,” Ohio Sea Grant Twine Line Winter/Spring 2013, pg. 10-11. The presentation slides can be used on their own, or integrated into a larger presentation on Lake Erie fishing and fisheries.

LENGTH: 9 pages

Ohio's Lake Erie charter fishing industry in 2010

OHSU-TS-660
Ohio's Lake Erie charter fishing industry in 2010
LENGTH: 29 pages

Lake Erie Nutrient Loading and Harmful Algal Blooms: Research Findings and Management Implications

OHSU-TS-600
Lake Erie Nutrient Loading and Harmful Algal Blooms: Research Findings and Management Implications
LENGTH: 16 pages

Help Great Lakes communities assess climate risks, opportunities and vulnerabilities - a logic model overview

OHSU-TS-650
Help Great Lakes communities assess climate risks, opportunities and vulnerabilities - a logic model overview
LENGTH: 1 page

Great Lakes Sea Grant network logic model for climate resilient communities

OHSU-TS-620
Great Lakes Sea Grant network logic model for climate resilient communities
LENGTH: 1 page
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